"Method of this work: literary montage. I have nothing to say only to show" --Walter Benjamin

Dans le Salon d’une Maison Close[1] is one of the brothel monotypes of Edgar Degas.
Long live the cult of ugliness?

Dans le Salon d’une Maison Close[1] is one of the brothel monotypes of Edgar Degas.

Long live the cult of ugliness?

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Die gegenstandslose Welt via quincampoix.
From this document comes the famous dictum “Art no longer cares to serve the state and religion.”

Die gegenstandslose Welt via quincampoix.

From this document comes the famous dictum “Art no longer cares to serve the state and religion.”

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In 1967 Polish artist Roman Cieslewicz designed a poster with the words “Che Si" (translation: ‘Yes Che’) emblazoned over the "Guerrillero Heroico's" face as eyes and nose. This was later featured on the October 1967 cover of the French art magazine Opus International.

In 1967 Polish artist Roman Cieslewicz designed a poster with the words “Che Si" (translation: ‘Yes Che’) emblazoned over the "Guerrillero Heroico'sface as eyes and nose. This was later featured on the October 1967 cover of the French art magazine Opus International.

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It’s surprising that the combination “unreliable narrator”, “Baron Münchhausen" "Don Quixote”[1] only brings up 36 hits.
Film still: Baron Munchausen’s Dream[2] by Georges Méliès. 

It’s surprising that the combination “unreliable narrator”, “Baron Münchhausen" "Don Quixote[1] only brings up 36 hits.

Film still: Baron Munchausen’s Dream[2] by Georges Méliès

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Currently reading  De Zahir.

Currently reading  De Zahir.

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“A bed likes to get out once in a while”, one of the best pieces of dream art ever.

A bed likes to get out once in a while”, one of the best pieces of dream art ever.

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“Sleep is the single happiness of the unhappy”
By Goya of course. Click the link for the story.

Sleep is the single happiness of the unhappy

By Goya of course. Click the link for the story.

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The excesses of the French Revolution are best illustrated by two visuals.
First there is Petit Souper a la Parisienne which I posted four years ago[1].
Then, there is Mort de la princesse de Lamballe (1908, above), a painting by French artist Léon-Maxime Faivre (1856-1941), based on details of the death of Princess of Lamballe.
A summary of the ferociousness of the excesses is perhaps the dictum “May the last king be strangled in the bowels of the last priest.”
Notable episodes in the history of the excesses of the French Revolution are the September Massacres, the guillotine executions, the Reign of Terror, the dechristianization, the drownings at Nantes and Republican marriages, the Death of Marat, the beheading of Louis XVI, the War in the Vendée and the death of Princess of Lamballe.
More at French Revolution#Excesses 

The excesses of the French Revolution are best illustrated by two visuals.

First there is Petit Souper a la Parisienne which I posted four years ago[1].

Then, there is Mort de la princesse de Lamballe (1908, above), a painting by French artist Léon-Maxime Faivre (1856-1941), based on details of the death of Princess of Lamballe.

A summary of the ferociousness of the excesses is perhaps the dictum “May the last king be strangled in the bowels of the last priest.”

Notable episodes in the history of the excesses of the French Revolution are the September Massacres, the guillotine executions, the Reign of Terror, the dechristianization, the drownings at Nantes and Republican marriages, the Death of Marat, the beheading of Louis XVI, the War in the Vendée and the death of Princess of Lamballe.

More at French Revolution#Excesses 

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Jan Švankmajer ‘s interpretation of Horace Walpole’s nightmare
Some have seen in Horace Walpole’s nightmare of a gigantic hand in armour — which would lead to the writing of The Castle of Otranto in 1764 — a possible starting point of Romanticism.
Here is Jan Švankmajer's interpretation of that dream, in a still[1] from the short film Castle of Otranto (Otrantský zámek) (1979), which is on Youtube[2] without subtitles.

Jan Švankmajer ‘s interpretation of Horace Walpole’s nightmare

Some have seen in Horace Walpole’s nightmare of a gigantic hand in armour — which would lead to the writing of The Castle of Otranto in 1764 — a possible starting point of Romanticism.

Here is Jan Švankmajer's interpretation of that dream, in a still[1] from the short film Castle of Otranto (Otrantský zámek) (1979), which is on Youtube[2] without subtitles.

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Lady with the Big Eyes (my title)[1] is perhaps the finest of the Fayum mummy portraits 

Lady with the Big Eyes (my title)[1] is perhaps the finest of the Fayum mummy portraits 

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