"Method of this work: literary montage. I have nothing to say only to show" --Walter Benjamin

La Troupe de Mademoiselle Eglantine [1] (1895-6) is a poster designed by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec.
It depicts four can-can dancers, none of whom seem very happy, on the contrary, only the second woman from the left remotely smiles. The woman on the far left looks distressed, the one to her right looks very angry at the woman to her right and the woman she glances at, on the far right, looks downright furious, squinting her eyes. One of the women is Jane Avril.
The black stockings coming from beneath the white dresses look like disembodied lower legs. 

La Troupe de Mademoiselle Eglantine [1] (1895-6) is a poster designed by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec.

It depicts four can-can dancers, none of whom seem very happy, on the contrary, only the second woman from the left remotely smiles. The woman on the far left looks distressed, the one to her right looks very angry at the woman to her right and the woman she glances at, on the far right, looks downright furious, squinting her eyes. One of the women is Jane Avril.

The black stockings coming from beneath the white dresses look like disembodied lower legs

4 notes

Nature très morte[1] (1884) by a certain “Sage” was one of the exhibits at the 1884 Incoherents exhibition.
The title literally translates as “very dead nature” but it is actually a play of words on nature morte (dead nature) which is French for still life.

Nature très morte[1] (1884) by a certain “Sage” was one of the exhibits at the 1884 Incoherents exhibition.

The title literally translates as “very dead nature” but it is actually a play of words on nature morte (dead nature) which is French for still life.

2 notes

Again, just some of my old favorites.
Nocturne au parc royal de Bruxelles (1897) - William Degouve de Nuncques

Again, just some of my old favorites.

Nocturne au parc royal de Bruxelles (1897) - William Degouve de Nuncques

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At 9:12 in this[1] version of À propos de Nice by Jean Vigo we see a sideways shot of a woman, first dressed in a fur coat, then a dissolve and the woman wears a dress, then she wears what appears to be a black dress, then a white dress, then again a dark dress, and then completely nude apart from her black shoes. The next film cut is to a nude art deco statue.
Above is a GIF animation of the ‘nude’ dissolve.
Via colettesaintyves

At 9:12 in this[1] version of À propos de Nice by Jean Vigo we see a sideways shot of a woman, first dressed in a fur coat, then a dissolve and the woman wears a dress, then she wears what appears to be a black dress, then a white dress, then again a dark dress, and then completely nude apart from her black shoes. The next film cut is to a nude art deco statue.

Above is a GIF animation of the ‘nude’ dissolve.

Via colettesaintyves

(via cigarettefingers)

994 notes

Just posting some old favorites.
“Artichoke" wallpaper[1], by John Henry Dearle for William Morris & Co.

Just posting some old favorites.

3 notes

L’argent (money)[1] from the Intimacies, a series of ten woodcuts by Félix Vallotton produced in 1897 and published in La Revue Blanche.
Via bildwerk:

L’argent (money)[1] from the Intimaciesa series of ten woodcuts by Félix Vallotton produced in 1897 and published in La Revue Blanche.

Via bildwerk:

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The Vampire (William Mortensen photograph)[1]
Via mariticide

The Vampire (William Mortensen photograph)[1]

Via mariticide

(via serialkiller)

122 notes

An Essay on Man (Ernst Cassirer) 
See prev.post.

An Essay on Man (Ernst Cassirer) 

See prev.post.

2 notes

“Nimm dich selbst bei der Nase”
That self-knowledge is the highest aim of philosophical inquiry appears to be generally acknowledged” —Essay on Man

Nimm dich selbst bei der Nase

That self-knowledge is the highest aim of philosophical inquiry appears to be generally acknowledged” —Essay on Man

7 notes

Dans le Salon d’une Maison Close[1] is one of the brothel monotypes of Edgar Degas.
Long live the cult of ugliness?

Dans le Salon d’une Maison Close[1] is one of the brothel monotypes of Edgar Degas.

Long live the cult of ugliness?

10 notes