"Method of this work: literary montage. I have nothing to say only to show" --Walter Benjamin

I finally hold a copy of Five Faces of Modernity in my hand, after discovering the book in January 2006.
I found it in the Antwerp University library (located in a very Harry Potter-like 17th century building).
This the 1977 version, which does not include the postmodernism chapter.
I used it to update my avant-garde page.

I finally hold a copy of Five Faces of Modernity in my hand, after discovering the book in January 2006.

I found it in the Antwerp University library (located in a very Harry Potter-like 17th century building).

This the 1977 version, which does not include the postmodernism chapter.

I used it to update my avant-garde page.

2 notes

I’ve been investigating the history of nonsense, at least, a small part of it, the history of nonsense words. That history starts with the words blituri and skindapsos.
Both are mentioned in Deleuze’s The Logic of Sense, which I’ve yet to read.
When I started looking for an illustration, I found that it’s not easy to find a good illustration for nonsense.
I’ve already found a pretty good one for my post on this subject over at the macroblog[1].
And then I remembered, nonsense is the antonym of sense and then, on the sense page over at Wikipedia, I saw this nice detail of an allegory of sense painting: The Senses of Hearing, Touch and Taste[2](above), a painting by Jan Brueghel the Elder (1568–1625).
So I decided to quit searching for a nonsense picture and give you a picture of sense and give you the Brueghel.
Does that make sense?
Hey, maybe it doesn’t, but then again, you do get a little bit of gratuitous nudity in this painting, with the nipples peeping over the top of the dress.

I’ve been investigating the history of nonsense, at least, a small part of it, the history of nonsense words. That history starts with the words blituri and skindapsos.

Both are mentioned in Deleuze’s The Logic of Sense, which I’ve yet to read.

When I started looking for an illustration, I found that it’s not easy to find a good illustration for nonsense.

I’ve already found a pretty good one for my post on this subject over at the macroblog[1].

And then I remembered, nonsense is the antonym of sense and then, on the sense page over at Wikipedia, I saw this nice detail of an allegory of sense painting: The Senses of Hearing, Touch and Taste[2](above), a painting by Jan Brueghel the Elder (1568–1625).

So I decided to quit searching for a nonsense picture and give you a picture of sense and give you the Brueghel.

Does that make sense?

Hey, maybe it doesn’t, but then again, you do get a little bit of gratuitous nudity in this painting, with the nipples peeping over the top of the dress.

5 notes

Mariano Akerman posted a nice “rocaille”[1] set of ornamental prints.
Above is the informally titled “Ornement rocaille avec cascade" by French ornemaniste Jean-Jacques Hubert [2]). It fits the genre I (following John Coulthart, I believe) have termed LSD Rococo[3].

Mariano Akerman posted a nice “rocaille[1] set of ornamental prints.

Above is the informally titled “Ornement rocaille avec cascade" by French ornemaniste Jean-Jacques Hubert [2]). It fits the genre I (following John Coulthart, I believe) have termed LSD Rococo[3].

2 notes

Irrational Man: A Study in Existential Philosophy
Via asfkrs

Irrational Man: A Study in Existential Philosophy

Via asfkrs

27 notes

Goya’s caricaturesque self-portrait  [1] is a caricature of the Goya, drawn by himself. It depicts the artist with prognathous jaw and is found in one of Goya’s letters to his friend Martín Zapater. 

Goya’s caricaturesque self-portrait  [1] is a caricature of the Goya, drawn by himself. It depicts the artist with prognathous jaw and is found in one of Goya’s letters to his friend Martín Zapater

5 notes

I stumbled upon Susan Sontag’s essay “One Culture and the New Sensibility" (1965) and rewrote a large part of my nobrow page. 
“One Culture and the New Sensibility" is an essay by Susan Sontag first published in Mademoiselle in 1965. It was later collected in an expanded version in Against Interpretation (above) of 1966. The essay is often referenced for noting that the boundaries between low culture and high culture were disappearing, an evolution now known as nobrow.

I stumbled upon Susan Sontag’s essay “One Culture and the New Sensibility" (1965) and rewrote a large part of my nobrow page. 

One Culture and the New Sensibility" is an essay by Susan Sontag first published in Mademoiselle in 1965. It was later collected in an expanded version in Against Interpretation (above) of 1966. The essay is often referenced for noting that the boundaries between low culture and high culture were disappearing, an evolution now known as nobrow.

2 notes

La Troupe de Mademoiselle Eglantine [1] (1895-6) is a poster designed by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec.
It depicts four can-can dancers, none of whom seem very happy, on the contrary, only the second woman from the left remotely smiles. The woman on the far left looks distressed, the one to her right looks very angry at the woman to her right and the woman she glances at, on the far right, looks downright furious, squinting her eyes. One of the women is Jane Avril.
The black stockings coming from beneath the white dresses look like disembodied lower legs. 

La Troupe de Mademoiselle Eglantine [1] (1895-6) is a poster designed by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec.

It depicts four can-can dancers, none of whom seem very happy, on the contrary, only the second woman from the left remotely smiles. The woman on the far left looks distressed, the one to her right looks very angry at the woman to her right and the woman she glances at, on the far right, looks downright furious, squinting her eyes. One of the women is Jane Avril.

The black stockings coming from beneath the white dresses look like disembodied lower legs

7 notes

Nature très morte[1] (1884) by a certain “Sage” was one of the exhibits at the 1884 Incoherents exhibition.
The title literally translates as “very dead nature” but it is actually a play of words on nature morte (dead nature) which is French for still life.

Nature très morte[1] (1884) by a certain “Sage” was one of the exhibits at the 1884 Incoherents exhibition.

The title literally translates as “very dead nature” but it is actually a play of words on nature morte (dead nature) which is French for still life.

2 notes

Again, just some of my old favorites.
Nocturne au parc royal de Bruxelles (1897) - William Degouve de Nuncques

Again, just some of my old favorites.

Nocturne au parc royal de Bruxelles (1897) - William Degouve de Nuncques

8 notes

At 9:12 in this[1] version of À propos de Nice by Jean Vigo we see a sideways shot of a woman, first dressed in a fur coat, then a dissolve and the woman wears a dress, then she wears what appears to be a black dress, then a white dress, then again a dark dress, and then completely nude apart from her black shoes. The next film cut is to a nude art deco statue.
Above is a GIF animation of the ‘nude’ dissolve.
Via colettesaintyves

At 9:12 in this[1] version of À propos de Nice by Jean Vigo we see a sideways shot of a woman, first dressed in a fur coat, then a dissolve and the woman wears a dress, then she wears what appears to be a black dress, then a white dress, then again a dark dress, and then completely nude apart from her black shoes. The next film cut is to a nude art deco statue.

Above is a GIF animation of the ‘nude’ dissolve.

Via colettesaintyves

(via cigarettefingers)

1,005 notes